Fall Into Rosé with Wines of Provence

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Wines of Provence. All opinions are 100% mine.

#FallIntoRose Wines of Provence

#FallIntoRose Wines of Provence

#FallIntoRose Wines of Provence

There’s no feeling like coming home from a long day, changing into comfy sweats, pouring yourself a glass of wine, and eating dinner. To me, it feels like a solid transition between work and relaxing. That feeling of letting the work day go is blissful.

These days, I’ve been sipping on rosé. Just because it isn’t summer anymore doesn’t mean I can’t have myself a glass of the pretty pink wine. Plus, it makes me feel a bit like I’m on a vacation–as though I’m wandering aimlessly through the picturesque streets of Paris. 

Yes, you’ll see photos of friends posting #basic along with their glasses of rosé but rosé itself is actually pretty #extra. 

Rosé has a place beyond girls’ nights and brunches. It can be enjoyed at any time really, no matter the season or the occasion.

Why? It’s because its flavors are so balanced and light. Rosé can be paired with your favorite cheeses and meats for a happy hour but also goes well with your favorite fall and winter foods. Hearty soups, light salads, dishes with seasonal squash, pumpkin pie, Thanksgiving turkey…rosé can be paired with any one of these meals. 

It’s underrated and perfect balance of flavor makes it easy to pair with just about anything. And because it’s light and not bursting with flavor like many other wines, it’s easy to sip on its own–even for friends who “don’t really like wine”. 

That’s what makes rosé the perfect happy hour drink, hostess gift, or dinner pairing. I’m actually going to be bringing rosé to my next family dinner because no matter what’s being served, rosé will pair well. Plus, it’s effortlessly elegant. 
#FallIntoRose Wines of Provence

It’s easier said than done to find good rosé. I’ve had some of the cheap stuff, and there’s a HUGE difference between the cheap stuff and the good stuff.  Picking a low quality rosé doesn’t really cut it. I’m going to teach you a little bit more about rosé so that the next bottle you buy is the good stuff. 

Rosé can be made very differently depending on where it’s from. Americans usually drink rosé made from Pinot Noir, which is different from the rosé from Provence. Rosé from the United States looks dark, much closer to a red wine than rosé from Provence, which is a much lighter pink.

France is actually the #1 producer of rosé wine, and Wines of Provence knows what they’re doing when it comes to rosé. #Mastersofrosé

#FallIntoRose Wines of Provence

Wines of Provence includes many wineries across different areas of Provence. Each area is has its own lovely characteristics which lend to different variations of rosé wine. I had the opportunity to try three of amazing rosé wines from Wines of Provence, and they were all spectacular.

Here’s a little guide to the regions:

  1. Côtes de Provence – It’s the largest producer of rosé wine in Provence and produces mostly rosé. 90% of the wine they produce is rosé. The rest is red and white wine. Even within this region, mainly known for having a warm and sunny mediterranean climate, there are different sub-regions with micro-climates. All the micro-climates affect what type of characteristics the wine since different types of grapes are grown throughout the sub-regions. The bottle with the pink on it, La Caprice de Clementine, is from here. 
  2. Coteaux d’Aix-en-Provence – The vineyards here date back as far as 600 BC. Yeah, BC. Some of the producers here use more cabernet sauvignon in their rosé than the other producers, distinguishing it from the others. It’s the second largest region. The bottle with the script writing, Domain Vallon du Glauges, is from this region. 
  3. Coteaux Varois en Provence – Known as the “Heart of Provence” for it’s central location, it’s the region with the highest altitude. That means the grapes go through very hot summers, very cold winers, and very mild spring and autumn seasons. The higher altitude means the grapes can benefit from a longer, drawn-out ripening. That gives these wines complex flavors. The Chateau Margui rosé pictured is from here. 

It’s amazing to think that there are so many factors that play into how our wine tastes, isn’t it? I know I’m going to be buying more bottles of the Chateau Margui rosé, because that was a favorite of mine among all three. 

#FallIntoRose Wines of Provence

If you’re in New York or San Francisco, you should check out the Wines of Provence Restaurant week. From October 2 – 22, chefs in restaurants throughout both cities will highlight these lovely rosés by pairing them with fall and winter recipes. Get more info at isitaroseday.com.

Since rosé is so versatile, it can even be used in making some cocktails or alcoholic drinks. 

So, I have to ask you–have you ever thought about swapping out the red wine in your sangria for rosé? You’ll have to try out this recipe for Rosé Sangria and bring it to your next party. 

Rose Sangria

Rose Sangria

Rose Sangria

Rose Sangria

Rose Sangria

Rose Sangria

Rose Sangria

Rosé Sangria

Ingredients

  • 8 cups of fruit of your choice (think mixed berries, peaches, apples)
  • 1 tablespoon superfine sugar
  • 5 oz of raspberry liqueur (you can also sub in your favorite hard alcohol if that's your style)
  • 1 bottle of rosé
  • 1 1/3 cup white cranberry juice

Instructions

  1. In a large punch bowl or pitcher, add the fruit of your choice, sugar, and raspberry liqueur. Mix it all together and let sit for an hour.
  2. Then, stir in the juice and the rosé.
  3. Serve chilled.
http://www.thesassylife.com/fall-into-rose-with-wines-of-provence/

Hope you enjoy the recipe! It’s time to stock up on rosé and have #RoséAllYear!

Yum

Leave a Reply